Supporting and Encouraging Nurse Leaders with Amy Deagle

Supporting and Encouraging Nurse Leaders with Amy Deagle

Supporting and Encouraging Nurse Leaders with Amy Deagle

This week on the podcast is super special because INNL founder, Amy Deagle, is in the hot seat! Former guest and nurse leader, Joanne Petersen, switched into the interviewer seat to ask Amy how she got into nursing, challenges she sees in the sector and where she hopes INNL will go.

Episode Highlights

We start by talking about how Amy and her sister played labour and delivery nurses as children and go on to discuss:

  • The origins of Amy’s passion for nursing
  • The vision for INNL and how she wants to support nurse leaders
  • Fighting the nursing brain vs. embracing the power of it
  • Advice for nurses who are struggling to find their fit
  • Transformational experiences in her career
  • Everyday leadership during every nursing interaction
  • Amy’s pillars for nursing

Key Points

  •   Be intentional on how you’re showing up. Make sure you put your best foot forward.
  • Try 20 seconds of insane courage – it could just change your life.
  • Be generous – you don’t know how your actions will impact someone else.

Shareable Quotes

“I had been fighting my nursing intuition for so long, because I’d been told it was wrong and bad. But it was in that situation that I thought I can’t step out of my nursing brain. This is who I am and I needed to learn to trust it.”

—Amy Deagle on following your gut

 

“There are people out there that want to see you succeed, you just have to find them.”

—Amy Deagle

Mentioned in this Episode

Everyday Leadership TED Talk with Drew Dudley

 

 

Advocate For Issues That Matter with Patrick Chiu

Advocate For Issues That Matter with Patrick Chiu

 Advocate For Issues That Matter with Patrick Chiu

 

Today on the podcast we’re joined by Patrick Chiu. Patrick is an RN working in a variety of settings since he started in 2012. He started his career at the bedside and later moved into policy and professional practice roles. He graduated with his Bachelor of Science in Nursing from McMaster University in 2012, his Masters in Public Health from Simon Fraser University in 2016, and he has begun his PhD at the University of Alberta this fall. Patrick was a 2017 scholar at the International Council of Nurses, Global Nursing Policy Leadership Institute.

 

Patrick has had a fascinating career to date, even though he’s ‘only’ been nursing for seven years. It’s nurses like Patrick who are breaking the status quo and moving the profession forward.

 

Episode Highlights

 

We begin by talking about his experience working in acute care and go on to discuss:

 

  • How nursing can impact public health policy
  • Leadership as a state of being not necessarily as a title
  • The value of professional associations
  • Transformational leadership: new power vs. old power
  • Creating safer working environments for healthcare workers
  • Accurate portrayal of nurses in the media (or rather the need for it!)
  • Issues that nurses can champion for change

 

Key Points

 

Find a cause that you’re passionate about and champion it.

 

Take part in professional associations to learn and network.

 

Shareable Quotes

 

“I’ve only been a nurse for seven years and I haven’t been in a formal managerial position, but to me leadership is more about what you do and how you do it, and it’s not so much about a title. I wouldn’t even describe it as a career path; it’s more of a way of being. For me it’s about first and foremost how do you lead yourself, understanding what are your strengths and weeknesses and understanding how you can influence your own thoughts and behaviours to achieve a specific goal.”

—Patrick Chiu

 

“For so long we’ve staffed as that two feet and a heartbeat mentality. I think it comes down to looking at the person and where their best fit is. Where are their strengths and weaknesses? It would help a lot with job satisfaction as opposed to trying to fit a person into a role.” 

—Amy Deagle

 

“We’ve always been able to bring forward a lense of equity, of social justice. We’ve always been able to link certain public policies to the impact that it has on the community level, and we’ve always been good at supporting individuals who don’t have a voice to have a voice and empowering them to speak up. With any policy issue that we’re advocating, we need to remember to bring forward the nursing perspective.”

—Patrick Chiu

 

Mentioned in this Episode

 

International Council of Nurses
ICN Leadership for Change
Patrick Chiu on Twitter
Helen Bevan Horizons NHS
Harvard Business Review
Longwoods Nursing Leadership Journal

 

 

Stories Hold Power with Joanne Petersen (Part 2)

Stories Hold Power with Joanne Petersen (Part 2)

 

Stories Hold Power with Joanne Petersen (Part 2)

We are back for round two with the incredible Joanne Petersen. If you haven’t checked out Part 1 of the interview with Joanne, I highly recommend that you do so now. She shares incredible wisdom on the power of the words we use and how we talk about ourselves, which leads perfectly into today’s conversation.

Episode Highlights

Joanne rejoins us and immediately makes me by offering to interview me for this podcast, so stay tuned. We go on to discuss:

  • Nursing Now 2020 and the work Joanne individually committed to
  • Ending PJ Paralysis
  • Imposter syndrome and how it can strike anyone
  • How simple things (like getting dressed) make huge shifts in health
  • The power of stories vs. data
  • The skill set of rural nurses
  • Recognizing burnout when you feel it coming
  • The self-talk we experience (both good and bad)

Key 3 Points

1. Have the courage to tell your story
2. Personal connection adds to the value of your patient relationships.
3. Be bold. Listen to the first voice that fired you up.

 

Shareable Quotes

“Grow the nurses of the future.” – Joanne Petersen on NursingNow2020

 

“Nursing was born in the church, raised in the military, and that’s why we put our patients into uniform – pajamas.” — a take on the original Florence Nightingale quote.

 

“These patients are not just our patients. They’re our Grandma’s bridge partner.” —Joanne Petersen

 

“The data is very important, but it’s the stories that will have impact.” —Joanne Petersen

 

Mentioned in this Episode

End PJ Paralysis

Nursing Now 2020

 

Challenge The Language You Use with Joanne Petersen

Challenge The Language You Use with Joanne Petersen

Challenge The Language You Use with Joanne Petersen

This week on the podcast I’m joined by the immediate Past President of the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses Association, Joanne Petersen. Joanne shares so much wisdom in our interview that we will be coming back in two weeks for Part 2! 

Episode Highlights

Joanne opens by telling us how her career started both in the community and the hospital that she was born in. We go on to discuss:

  • Working as a nurse on cruise ships
  • The difference between Canada and U.S. nursing
  • The start of her leadership journey with the SRNA
  • The importance of succession planning
  • Challenging the language that we use
  • Indigenous wisdom and supporting truth and reconciliation
  • And so much more…

Key 3 Points

1. As you rise, bring others up with you. There’s room for us all.
2. Be an ally to both your co-workers and your community
3. Embrace change, both for yourself and the sector.

 

Shareable Quotes

“When you see something in someone that maybe they don’t see in themselves, that’s a good opportunity to tap someone. And that’s actually been a huge part of my leadership journey, is that I now believe that as I climb, I should be lifting and tapping those people, and bringing them up with me.” – Joanne Petersen

 

“Wouldn’t the stars have all aligned if I was President [of the SRNA] when my daughter got her first nursing license. That would be the best feeling in the world.” – Joanne Petersen

“Work to the top of our license.” – Joanne Petersen

 

Mentioned in this Episode

SRNA